More hiking reviews

Hike #15: Joffre Lakes Hike: 4 Km.
Sorry for the hiatus, but we were off the grid for a bit enjoying B.C.’s Sunshine Coast of B.C. I will pick up a week ago while we were in the Whistler area. This hike was a lesson that in Canada a hike considered easy/family friendly, means something a whole lot different than it does in the States.
The Joffre Lakes hike took us past three different glacier fed lakes with the most amazing blue you’ve ever seen. The first lake, was a quick jaunt from the parking lot, and consisted of many folks wearing flip flops. To access the other two lakes, the trail took us up through rock and tree root scrambles, across a path of boulders that looked like a giant tossed them there, and past workers doing construction. More than one time along our hike the only clue we were still on the trail was locating a simple orange diamond nailed to a tree. We were at a stand-still at one point with Noel swearing on one direction while I was certain it was the other. Like life, this trail was long, strenuous, worth the effort but sometimes easier for someone else.

Us trying to look like it was an easy hike!

Us trying to look like it was an easy hike!

Hike #16: Wetlands Nature Trail, Sechelt , Sunshine Coast B.C.This was short board walk trail through a small wetland along the coast. It reminded me how much wetlands ROCK! They are natural purifiers of our water, a superb habitat for many plants, species and animals. How awesome is that?

Wetland hike

Wetland hike

Trail #17 Coast Purple Banner Trail:
Along the sunshine coast, the arts community is full on strong. Flying a purple banner outside a home/studio was an invitation for folks to come in, talk and tour the place in which these artists art comes alive. Henna, whom is our artist in residence, was excited to get a first- hand look at the places in which the art forms that she loves is created. We visited: a finger painter (and no this artist was not five years old), a weaver (who also knits, and makes her own yarn), glass blower, and a blacksmith. In each studio we were introduced to such a cool way of life, in which artist go from their home straight to their studio, while enjoying the slower paced feel of the coast. We talked about the coast, life, Chicago and what got them started in the art form that led to their lives work. It made me so wish that I had some kind of artist skill. So I’ve decided that in my next chapter I will definitely learn something new that is both artsy and amazing.

Trail #18 Skookumchuck Narrows trail:
Skookumchuch means “strong water”, and since I had such difficulty pronouncing this trail I was at least glad to know what the heck it meant. This trial is a coast favorite, and leads you to tidewater that is forced through Skookumchuck Narrows and forms the Sechelt Rapids. The rapids are best viewed at high tide, and this specific day the rapids were being rated as XL. This 4K trail led us through a cedar nursery as this area was logged about 50 years ago, to drop us off at Roland point in which we were able to view the rapids. The viewing platform was simply an exposed barnacle covered rock that was assumedly much bigger before the tide came in. We especially enjoyed the small tidal pools filled with jelly fish and crabs. Henna explored these small worlds, and I fought back the fear of her falling back into the giant Hawaii sized waves behind her. We met some nice folks from Washington who took our picture. The guy taking our picture was a videographer and I felt like we were part of a vide shoot with the seriousness he brought to taking our picture.

Our photo shoot!

Our photo shoot!

We hope all is well at home and everyone’s summer is going great!
Corey

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